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View Full Version : See 120 Hz vs IPS side by side in Bay Area



yeehi
05-09-2013, 03:24 AM
Where can we walk into a Bay Area store and see with our own eyes 120 Hz vs 60 Hz (IPS) side by side?

I realize that it is likely not possible to be able to see an overclocked 120Hz IPS catleap, but I would like to see and experience the difference for ourselves.

I imagine that to really experience it, the store would have to let us try and play a fps game while there.

Also, I would like to demonstrate this difference to somebody I know. (Who, by the way, also doesn't think there is any difference between modern onboard sound and a dedicated sound card!)

Hope to hear from you! :)

Sneaky
05-09-2013, 04:32 AM
Well there are no mainstream brand 120Hz 2560x1440 27" IPS monitors on the market at the moment so you won't see any in stores.
You will however see 27" 120Hz 1080p TN monitors in store as well as 27" 60Hz 2560x1440 IPS monitors so you could compare them
for at least - Image quality.

Shadman
05-09-2013, 07:41 PM
Take a trip down to Ventura, I'd love to show it off to you.

yeehi
05-10-2013, 10:58 AM
That would be great, Shadman. If I am in the area, I will have a look. Do you know of any place closer to the Bay?

Shadman
05-11-2013, 01:46 PM
You'll just have to ask members here, but no one that I can immediately remember.

mdrejhon
05-18-2013, 05:23 PM
Where can we walk into a Bay Area store and see with our own eyes 120 Hz vs 60 Hz (IPS) side by side?

Just be aware that different 120Hz displays have different amounts of motion blur:

baseline - 60 Hz mode (16.7ms continuously-shining frame)
40% less motion blur (1.7x clearer) - 120 Hz IPS/PLS mode (~8.33ms + a bit of streaking)
50% less motion blur (2x clearer) - 120 Hz TN (8.33ms continuously-shining frame)
60% less motion blur (2.4x clearer) - 144 Hz TN (6.94ms continuously-shining frame)
85% less motion blur (7x clearer) - 120 Hz LightBoost, set to 100% (2.4ms frame strobe flashes)
92% less motion blur (12x clearer) - 120 Hz LightBoost, set to 10% (1.4ms frame strobe flashes)

The vast majority of motion blur on a modern LCD, is not caused by pixel persistence (now only a tiny fraction of a refresh), but rather caused by the sample-and-hold effect. This is explained in the article, "Why Do Some OLED's Have Motion Blur? (http://www.blurbusters.com/faq/oled-motion-blur)" (including scientific references) as well as in TFTCentral: Motion Blur Reduction Backlights (http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/articles/motion_blur.htm)

Edit: There's a new chart, comparing the various different modes:

http://www.blurbusters.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/motion-blur-graph.png (http://www.blurbusters.com/faq/60vs120vslb/)