Can you tell a difference between 1000Hz mouse and a regular one?
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View Poll Results: Can you tell a difference between 1000Hz and 125Hz mouse

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  1. #1
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    Can you tell a difference between 1000Hz mouse and a regular one?

    On theory, when playing at 125fps, a mouse with 1000Hz polling rate is going to have up to 7ms less delay than a regular mouse with 125Hz rate. But when playing at 120fps, the 125Hz mouse is going to stutter for up to ~7ms more.
    Have you tried both types of mouses (or maybe switching the pooling frequency of the 1000Hz mouse?) Does it make a difference?

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    I haven't tried switching off 1000hz polling but based on theory it should be that the faster the polling rate, the more accurate the information that is rendered and displayed at any given time. At 8ms between updates, a 125hz mouse would be almost great if it could sync up with a 125hz display. But because its not synced up, as you mentioned, the information going to a frame can be up to 7.99ms old. Whereas with a 1000hz mouse, it'll just be delayed by a maximum of 0.99ms. Again this is all just in theory. In a way...the perception difference between a 125hz mouse and 1000hz mouse could be not only the accuracy/smoothness, but can also act as a sort of input lag. Because what you've done with your mouse, when you're aiming in an fps for example, is delayed by up to 7ms.

  3. #3
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    I cant tell the difference between 500hz and 1000hz on my Sensie (but still use 100hz ofcourse). Maybe its just too fast to make a percieved differece? meaning the 500hz is more than enough and more Hz cant make a difference to the human control/eye?

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    Re: Can you tell a difference between 1000Hz mouse and a regular one?

    I've heard putting such a high polling rate on a mouse just puts a little more overhead and CPU usage.

    Just what I remember off am OCN thread, but I'm sure its hard to get hard evidence on most of this stuff
    What's cookin, good lookin?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadman View Post
    I've heard putting such a high polling rate on a mouse just puts a little more overhead and CPU usage.

    Just what I remember off am OCN thread, but I'm sure its hard to get hard evidence on most of this stuff
    Yeh thats how I understand it too, when the mouse is at 1000hz as apposed to say 500hz it 'talks' to the CPU twice as fast using more resources. This shouldn't be a problem with our i5's and i7's but I actually changed my little brothers PC from 1000hz to 500hz after reading up on it and it did slightly improve his minimum/average framerates on his aged Q6600 @Stock.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadman View Post
    I've heard putting such a high polling rate on a mouse just puts a little more overhead and CPU usage.
    If you close say,skype, you'll get more cpu cycles back. For 1000 mouse interrupts you are not losing even 1 KHz of your CPU.

    Cracka that shouldn't happen. Well if the mouse and usb drivers are poorly written then maybe.
    Last edited by winterhell; 01-19-2013 at 02:09 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by winterhell View Post
    If you close say,skype, you'll get more cpu cycles back. For 1000 mouse interrupts you are not losing even 1 KHz of your CPU.

    Cracka that shouldn't happen. Well if the mouse and usb drivers are poorly written then maybe.
    Happens with his steel series mouse, he gains 2-3 fps with 500hz as apposed to 1000hz on games like bf3 where his CPU really struggles, every little helps to make it more playable

  8. #8
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    When the CPU is not a limiting factor, 1000Hz mice improves gaming for MANY reasons:
    • More accurate X and Y positions even at just 125Hz on a 1000Hz mouse:. 125Hz mice can be very jerky but even if you take 1 out of 8 positions from a 1000Hz, the "125Hz subset of 1000Hz" is much more accurate because of more accurate sensors needed for 1000Hz -- the X and Y positions are often more accurate. Less random variances in the X and Y positions (even when you ignore the positions in between). These more accurate mouse X and Y positions benefits all gaming (regardless of whether you have VSYNC ON or OFF).
      .
    • Less Input Lag at 1000Hz: The higher frequency is a bonus because of less input lag -- the X and Y positions are delivered more freshly. The average latency decreases by one-half of 1/125sec, but can be up to 7ms less latency (nearly a full 1/125sec decrease in latency).
      .
    • Less tearing with VSYNC-OFF gaming: If you game with VSYNC turned off (e.g. 300fps), a 1000Hz mouse will yield MUCH more accurate VSYNC-off gaming, because the tearlines will be MUCH smaller (e.g. At 300fps, you gain 300 tiny near-invisible tearlines per second, is much better than 125 coarse bigger-offset tearlines per second that are more noticeable).
      .
    • Less aliasing between Mouse Hz and Display Hz: Dragging a window on a 120Hz display using a cheap 125Hz mouse, causes 5 stutters per second in the move (the beat frequency), because the mouse "jumps forward two times in one refresh" 5 times a second. By having 1000 samples per second, the window dragging position error is "off by 1 millisecond worth of movement" rather than "off by 8 millisecond worth of movement". (This is noticeable on CRT and on very fast pixel-response LCD's). The same applies to video game movements, e.g. stutters that happens only during mouse movement, rather than keyboard.

    I can feel a significant difference between a 125Hz mouse and a 1000Hz mouse, even for simple things like window dragging (at least on a CRT or LightBoost monitor, when there's no motion blur in window dragging).

    During video games, I adjust the mouse sensitivity of a gaming mouse to near maximum (Logitech G9X), and then adjust the video game's mouse sensitivity to near minimum. This gives me very silky smooth, very fast & accurate stutter-free mouse pans, and I can pan in tiny increments (even 1 pixel increments) yet still be able to flick my mouse and turn 180 degrees instantly -- all using a linear mouse response (no "nonlinear response" or "acceleration" tweaks). By doing this, the 1000 Hz mouse is AS SMOOTH AS STRAFING via keyboard.

    A good 1000Hz mouse allows me to PhotoShop at single pixel movements, yet accurately move a mouse pointer all the way across the screen (without overshooting) on a small wrist flick travelling only an inch -- and being able to do this without turning on "acceleration" behavior (that's just a cheat to help cheap mice) -- and landing exactly on a mouse button "on the cue".

    Make sure your CPU isn't the bottleneck (e.g. i7), and the 1000Hz mouse really improves quality, even for other reasons than the 1000Hz itself.

    CONCLUSION: All 120Hz monitor users who plays video games, SHOULD seriously consider a 1000Hz mouse to get the most out of their 120Hz display.
    Last edited by mdrejhon; 01-19-2013 at 11:34 AM.
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  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdrejhon View Post
    SNIP
    I love the things you post. Sir. Extremely informative.

  11. #10
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    mdrejhon
    I'm glad that you are seeing a difference. Criterion developers said they can achieve 50ms input delay on a CRT screen at 60fps, so that would make at least 25ms at 120fps.Considering we are dealing with an LCD screen that would add to the number. My fear was that "up to 7ms" improvement on the background of 35ms+ was not going to make a significant difference.
    While we are on topic, I'm considering to get a new mouse and I'm yet to decide between a few. Maybe you guys can recommend one? I don't need 10 thumb buttons, 2 are more than sufficient for me.
    P.S. Maybe also a mousepad to throw at it?
    Last edited by winterhell; 01-19-2013 at 12:02 PM.


 

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